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Many teens not getting driver's ed
Where to put hands on the steering wheel?
Back to (Driving) School: More Crashes and Convictions for Teens that Skip Driver Ed
Blind students required to pass driver's ed
AAA: Fewer driver's ed classes = more teen traffic accidents, convictions

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Teaching your Teen to drive Blog

Many teens not getting driver's ed

Reuters Health) - More than one in five U.S. teens never received driver's education before getting their licenses, according to a new report.
Among states that don't require formal driver training, the rate of teens who have not had driver's ed is even greater, although that doesn't mean teens are any less safe behind the wheel, researchers caution.
"This shouldn't be used as an alarm bell," said Jean Shope, a professor at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, who was not involved in this study.

Where to put hands on the steering wheel?

Where to put hands on the steering wheel?
By Gary Richards
From the first day in driving school, this lesson is drilled into our heads: Firmly grip the steering wheel in the 10-2 position. Now, law enforcement agencies are training officers to place their hands lower on the steering wheel, and some drivers' groups are changing position on hand position.
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For more than a year at the San Jose, Calif., Police Department, the recommended hold has been 9-3. The American Automobile Association also prefers 9-3.

Back to (Driving) School: More Crashes and Convictions for Teens that Skip Driver Ed



Back to (Driving) School: More Crashes and Convictions for Teens that Skip Driver Ed


AAA Foundation research reveals opportunities to produce smarter, safer drivers
Washington, D.C., (September 9, 2014) – Although vehicle crashes remain the leading cause of death for teens, fewer new drivers are participating in what used to be considered a rite of passage – driver education.  State funding and requirements for these programs have declined over recent decades, leaving uneducated teen drivers vulnerable on America’s roads.

Blind students required to pass driver's ed

Blind students required to pass driver's ed 
Disabled students not exempt from graduation prerequisite in Chicago

CHICAGO — Most high school students eagerly await the day they pass driver’s education class. But 16-year-old Mayra Ramirez is indifferent about it.Ramirez is blind, yet she and dozens of other visually impaired sophomores in Chicago schools are required to pass a written rules-of-the-road exam in order to graduate — a rule they say takes time away from subjects they might actually use.

AAA: Fewer driver's ed classes = more teen traffic accidents, convictions



BLOUNTVILLE — Fewer students taking driver's education in high school has resulted in an increase in teenagers in car accidents and traffic convictions nationwide, according to a recently released AAA study.
In the region, driver's education is a requirement in Virginia for those younger than 19 to get a license, but not across state line in Tennessee, where some local systems offer no driver's ed or limit it to classroom-only instruction.
"Driver's education is associated with a lower incidence of both crashes and convictions — reducing crashes by 4.

Say what? Effective in-car communication with your teen.

Say what? Effective in-car communication with your teen.

 

This mini how-to guide is intended to help you more effectively communicate with your teen during your first few weeks of behind-the-wheel practice.
Don’ts:Don’t engage in distracting conversations.
When your teen is first learning to drive, you need to restrict what you say to commenting about the current driving environment or to give instructions for what you want your teen to do. If your teen makes some sort of driving error, it can be tempting to bombard them with information about why what they just did was wrong.

Anticipating vs. Assuming

Anticipating vs. Assuming

 
A good driver is constantly scanning his surroundings, processing the information, and anticipating the actions of drivers around him.
For instance, when you’re driving on a busy two-lane city street with lots of shops, you’re processing an unbelievable amount of information. Not only are you scanning the road ahead and behind, you’re watching all of the side streets for cars about to enter or exit the roadway. There may also be pedestrians on side streets and at crosswalks.

What to do when the light turns yellow?

What to do when the light turns yellow?

 
The answer is simple: STOP. According to the law, every driver has to stop at a yellow light unless he or she is too close to the intersection to stop safely. So, how do you define “too close” to the intersection?
The point of no return
One rule of thumb is that if you are 100 feet or less from the intersection, you have passed the “point of no return” and cannot stop safely before the intersection. Therefore, it is best to continue at your current speed through the intersection, but be cautious as you pass through.

10 Things That Annoy Other Drivers

10 Things That Annoy Other Drivers

 
If you’re learning to drive or teaching a new driver the rules of the road, you need to understand proper driving etiquette. Because you’re rarely on the road all by yourself, it’s important to get along with your fellow drivers. So, check out this list of 10 driving behaviors that are sure to annoy everyone else on the road…and don’t do them!
1. Blinker Blindness: Your turn signals are not part of your portable psychedelic lightshow. They are solely to be used when you intend to make a turn or enter a road.

How to Minimize the Risk of Being Hit by a Drunk Driver

How to Minimize the Risk of Being Hit by a Drunk Driver

 
There’s no two ways about it: drinking and driving kills. In 2005, over 16,000 people were killed in alcohol-related crashes. This represents nearly 40% of all fatal auto accidents.

Unfortunately, it’s not just the drunk drivers who suffer from their own carelessness. Their passengers as well as other innocent drivers are needlessly killed or injured.

While there are no guarantees in life, there are things you can do to lower the risk of becoming the victim of a reckless drunk driver.
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